Media Appearances

The Council on Geostrategy and its staff and Associate Fellows have been cited and carried in leading British and international media publications and audio-visual networks. The most recent coverage can be seen below:

18 April 2021

Express on Sunday cites James Rogers

Marco Giannangeli, Defence Editor of the Express on Sunday, speaks to James Rogers about possible Russian action against Ukraine

18 April 2021

James Rogers and Andrew Foxall write for The Spectator

James Rogers and Andrew Foxall write about ‘discursive statecraft’ and Russia’s national positioning operations against the United Kingdom

20 April 2021

Charles Parton writes about his latest paper for The Spectator

Writing for The Spectator, Charles Parton summarises his latest paper, 'What the Chinese Communist Party wants from the United Kingdom.'

20 April 2021

Bloomberg cites the Council on Geostrategy’s latest Policy Paper

‘What the Chinese Communist Party wants from the United Kingdom’ by Charles Parton is cited by Bloomberg

20 April 2021

Charles Parton discusses his latest paper on Times Radio

Charles Parton discusses his latest paper with John Pienaar on Times Radio Drive. The clip begins 41 minutes into the show.

30 March 2021

The Times covers the Council on Geostrategy’s Policy Paper

Charles Parton’s ‘What the Chinese Communist Party wants from the United Kingdom’ Policy Paper receives coverage from The Times

28 March 2021

BBC Radio 4 interviews Charles Parton OBE

Council on Geostrategy Associate Fellow Charlies Parton is cited on BBC Radio 4’s ‘The World This Week’ on China-United Kingdom relations

28 March 2021

The Express on Sunday cites James Rogers

James Rogers is cited by Marco Giannangeli on proposals to develop alternatives to China’s international infrastructure programmes

28 March 2021

BrightBlue invites James Rogers to discuss foreign aid

James Rogers features on BrightBlue’s podcast Heads Apart? to discuss ‘What is the point of aid?’

28 March 2021

James Rogers writes for The Spectator

James Rogers explains why the British government, if forced to choose, should prioritise developing new military technologies over retaining troops